Ross Millar

MONO

ROSS MILLAR GROUP

ENTREPRENEUR, COMMUNITY CHAMPION, HORSEMAN

 

Ross Millar Group president Ross Millar – Ontario RAM Rodeo Series and Horsepower Live. Photo by: Pete Paterson

 

A veteran sports marketer, Ross’ love of the horse world started from the cowboy boots up, when he opened a shop to sell them. He now spends his long days developing ways to showcase the world of horses in events like the RAM Rodeo, and unwinds along the Bruce Trail with his horse Frosty.

 

Horse people are…

Everybody. Really. Whether you’re an accountant or a banker or work in a factory, when you get together on a Wednesday night to ride, you don’t talk about work.

 

What do you love about living up here?

We’ve kept it beautified. There’s certain directions that cities can take when they grow, they become industrial centres or condo living, but people with horses, we’re trying to make it horse country, and there’s one simple other alternative: we don’t do this and we let the city continue up here and away we go. We have to be conscientious about progressively moving it forward, while keeping a lovely living environment.

 

But horse country isn’t just about horse people.

I’m equally concerned about our trail systems, for the person who wants to come for a nature walk. It’s about a lifestyle. Horses just happen to fit into that lifestyle.

 

And being a top horse country is about more than just having land and horses.

We have several world-class facilities, we’ve got the horses, but most people don’t realize this: we’ve got rolling hills, we’ve got soil with sand and gravel underneath, so it doesn’t turn into mud swamps where the horse is standing knee-deep. Our topography is uniquely built and designed for horses. We’re also fortunate that the Bruce Trail runs right through here. You could ride from Owen Sound all the way down to Niagara Falls.

In France, you can get on bikes, ride all day and stay the night. I don’t see why we couldn’t have it where you’re on horseback, you stay at a place for the night, then get back out and travel that way all the way through. That’s the kind of long-term stuff we’re looking at.